Saturday, November 12, 2005

I, Too, Sing America by Langston Hughes

I, too, sing America.

I am the darker brother.
They send me to eat in the kitchen
When company comes,
But I laugh,
And eat well,
And grow strong.

Tomorrow,
I'll be at the table
When company comes.
Nobody'll dare
Say to me,
"Eat in the kitchen,"
Then.

Besides,
They'll see how beautiful I am
And be ashamed--

I, too, am America.


I discovered this poem on a website and found it to be very interesting. As the author, Langston Hughes is Aftican-Amiercan, it seems as if the literal meaning of the poem fits. I enjoy the storyline of the poem in its entirety and find it to be very intriging. I like how the poem contrasts and in a way gives two different points of the story. In the beginning of the poem, when the speaker says that "I am the darker brother," it basically just means that the speaker is different than the rest of the characters that he is referring to. As the poem continues and the speaker talks about how they send him to the kitchen to eat, it shows the racial discimination among society. However, as the poem progresses, the speaker shows the gradual change in society's outlook and treatment of people who are not of the same color. In the 3rd stanza, when the speaker talks about how no one will dare tell him to eat in the kitchen, it shows the uprising and growing of society as a whole. In the 4th stanza, when the speaker talks about how beautiful he is, it is symbolic of how everyone is beautiful, no matter what race or ethnicity they are. As the poem begins and ends with the same line, "I, too, am America," it is significant because it identifies what the whole poem is about. In America, there is supposed to be no racial discimination and freedom amongst everyone, which is what this poem is trying to show. I enjoy reading this poem because it just shows how far our country has come along.

1 Comments:

Blogger Kelsie Rae said...

amen! Langston Hughes's voice is amazing in this poem. He really expresses himself well of how he feels about freedom in America. A call for cooperation through the races. amen!

1:57 PM  

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